What's Blooming 

It's always a great time to visit the Ridge Road Garden Center!  We have a great selection of seasonal perennials and annuals that will beautify your gardens, no matter the size!  There is so much to see... perennials, annuals, bulbs, ornamental grasses, trees, flowering shrubs, ground covers, and shade plants for outdoors and indoors. Come and see our selection of gifts, garden tools, pots, soil, plant food, cactus, amendments and garden accessories at the Garden Center! 

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Camellias

 

The Southern belles of the plant world, camellias come in a wide variety of colors, shapes, and sizes. Camellias are evergreen shrubs with dark, glossy leaves. Flowers may be white, pink, red, or streaked, and blooms can be single or double. Similarities between peonies and camellias include lushly petaled blooms, and a tendency to live for more than a century. These broadleaf evergreen shrubs bear some of the most beautiful blooms during the colder months of the year. They offer bright, long-blooming flowers, and serve as popular foundation and specimen plants. Camellias require acidic soil that drains well. Camellias are best planted in rich, moist soil in a part-shade location. Caring for camellias will include water and fertilizer. You’ll find two primary species of camellias in American gardens: japonica and sasanqua camellias. The latter are hardier and tougher than the japonicas, tolerating drought and resisting disease better. Camellias are reliably hardy in USDA zones 7 to 9, although the fall-blooming ‘Winter’ series and spring-blooming ‘April’ series of camellias are hardy in zone 6B.

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Chrysanthemums

 

Planted for their really spectacular blooms that come in a variety of colors, shapes, and sizes, mums are the perfect fall-blooming plant. Their showy flowers appear in late summer and continue into the fall, creating dense mats of color. If you're planning on overwintering them, plant mums in late spring to give them time to develop roots. Mums are the quintessential flower of fall! They're sturdy, don't mind a light frost, and come in a rainbow of colors. Technically, they're perennials. They can be a few inches tall or a few feet, depending on the type. It is a plant that requires full sun and well-drained soil to grow, and it will do best in zones five to 10. Because of the plants’ shallow roots, it will need a bit more water than most plants. These fare so well in pots on porch steps or along the walkway until frost nips them. So cheery and colorful, they will brighten your home landscape well into winter.

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Heuchera

Coral bells (Heuchera) grown primarily for its colorful foliage, is a cold-tolerant perennial that comes in every shade from deepest burgundy to lime green and everything in between. The stunning, frilly leaves provide pops of color long after your other annuals have faded. Heuchera plants form round mounds with a woody rootstock or crown at their base. Small bell-shaped flowers appear in spring or early summer on tall stems. Rich in nectar, the flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies, plus they make nice cut flowers. Their leaves are rounded, lobed, hairy, and evergreen or semi-evergreen, depending on the climate. Besides traditional green-leaved coral bells, new varieties of heuchera have leaves in shades of purple, rose, lime green, gold, and variegations in between. Heuchera are native North American plants that are at home in woodlands, rock gardens, containers, and borders. They can also be used as ground covers. 

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Hellebores

Hybrid hellebores get their common name, Lenten rose, from the rose-like flowers that appear in early spring around the Christian observance of Lent. The “blooms” (which are actually sepals that protect the true flowers) last for several months, from February until May, and the foliage is evergreen in all but the coldest regions. Hellebores grow well in zones 4 through 8. The flowers are available in a wide range of colors, from white to crimson. Hellebores plants prefer rich, moist, well-drained soils. Plant them around other shrubs in the garden to add interest and to keep the deer away. Tolerant of a wide range of growing conditions, hybrid hellebores perform best when sited in partial shade in rich, moist, but well-draining soil. Hellebores are quite easy to grow, and since they are perennials, will continue to bloom for a number of years. Many gardeners like to plant hellebores on a hillside or in raised flower beds to better enjoy their downward-facing blooms.

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Pansies

 

The gardener knows pansies as flowers with almost heart-shaped, overlapping petals in bright colors or bi-colors, often with face-like center markings. Breeding has produced pansies that are better able to stand up to the cold, surprisingly hearty. They’ll survive a frost, bouncing back from even single digit temperatures. If the blooms wither in the cold, the plants will often stay alive to bloom again, which makes them a great flowering plant for fall and early winter color. Good for containers, borders, and as ground cover, they are a go-to flower for reliable color almost year-round. Pansies look pretty on their own in a monochrome scheme or in mixed colors; they also look pretty when planted with other cool-season flowers such as violas, primroses, trailing lobelia, and sweet alyssum. USDA Zones 7 and above can grow pansies throughout the winter, and there are newer varieties, such as the ice pansy, that are bred to withstand light snow. 

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Witch Hazel

 

A large deciduous shrub with colorful, fragrant flowers during the winter, witch hazel is virtually maintenance-free and resistant to most pests and diseases. Witch hazels perform best in full sun (or filtered shade in hotter regions), where the flowers glow like fiery embers in the backlight of the low winter sun. They prefer well-amended soil and regular water and are tolerant of acid or alkaline conditions. Native forms are hardier, while most hybrid cultivars grow in USDA Zones 5-8. A more heat tolerant variety, Hamamelis x intermedia 'Diane', can be grown in Zones 5-9. Once established, they are virtually maintenance-free and resistant to most pests and diseases. While most varieties reach 10-20 feet high and wide at maturity, witch hazels can be kept smaller with pruning once they are finished blooming. Prune before summer so that the following year’s buds can develop. Suckering twigs that form around the base should be removed. Once new flower buds appear, branches can be cut and forced to bloom inside.

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18815 Ridge Road, Pine Grove, CA 95665

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